Tuesday August 05, 2014

     Crosskeys Antiques - Fine European Decorative Furniture and Accessories

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* Please note, our Glossary of Terms is still under construction, please check back frequently*

 

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BACHELOR'S CHEST

Modern name for small chest of drawers in typically early 18th century English style.


Bachelors Chest

 

 


BACKGAMMON BOARD AND TABLE

The game goes back to the Middle Ages, and furniture for its play appeared as soon as

specialized tables appeared in the 17th century. Fine examples occur in
French and English work.


 

 


BAIL

Metal loop or ring forming a handle.

 

 


BALL FOOT

Round turning used as foot on chests, etc. Same as bun foot in England.



Ball Foot
 

 

BALLOON BACK

Chair back style developed by Hepplewhite, extensively used in Victorian work.

Balloon Back

 


BALUSTER

Small column, turned, squares, or flats, supporting a rail; it also formed chair backs in architectural forms.


Baluster

 


BAMBOO

The wood of the bamboo tree is used for furniture in the East. Its use came to the West with

the waves of traders and merchants.
 

 


BANDING

A narrow edging or border of veneer around fronts of drawers; a contrasting band of inlay.

 


BANTM WORK

Incised lacquer decoration common on Dutch and English furniture, also known as cutwork.
 



BARLEY-SUGAR TWIST

Type of turning in which the wood is shaped in a spiral; used on legs, columns or for decoration.
 



BAROQUE

The whole tendency of European design in the 17th century was toward exaggeration; over emphasized
brilliance. Motion is the essence of the Baroque, large curves, fantastic and irregular, are explosively interpreted, reversed,

and ornamented. Twisted columns, distorted and broken pediments and over-sized moldings
 sacrificed the structural sense to a tremendous theatrical effect.



Baroque

 

 


BAS-RELIEF

Sculpture in which the carving projects only slightly from the background.

 


BELLFLOWER

Ornamental detail, carved or painted, resembling bell-shaped flowers arranged vertically.




Bellflower

 

 

 

 
BELTER, JOHN HENRY

One of New York's foremost designers and a leading exponent of the rococo revival style.

He created elaborate panels using a technique that he patented (1804-63).

 


 

BERGERE


Upholstered armchair with closed upholstered sides.

Specifically, chairs of French style, copied in England and Germany.



 

 

BEVEL


A sloping edge, of various angles, applied to any material

 - wood, glass, metal, etc.  Similar to Chamfer.
 



BIEDERMEIER


German style, first half of the 19th century, chiefly based on French Empire forms.

It is essentially a style of  lesser nobility and the middle class imitating

the Paris Empire furniture of grander houses.



 

 

 

BIRD'S-EYE


Small figure in wood grain, resembling a bird's eye.

Principally in maple, but occasionally in other woods.

Cutting tangentially through the indentations that sometimes appear in the annual rings produces it.
 


BLIND TOOLING


The process of decorating leather with heated tools, often creating bands of running decoration,

but without the use of gold metal in the process.

The result is a pattern embossed to give shadow and texture to the leather.

 

BLOCK FOOT


Square end of an untapered leg, as in Chippendale work.
 


BOBBIN TURNING


A series of wooden spheres turned on a lathe,

used on 17th century and 18th century chair and table legs and stretchers.
 


BOISERIE


French term for woodwork; used specifically for 18th century carved panels.

 

 

BOMBE


Swelling or convex surface; bulging fronts and sides, as found in period furniture of Louis XV,

 late 18th century Italian and other Baroque work.
 


BONNET TOP


An unbroken pediment or top section of a highboy, secretary, etc.

Typical late 17th and early 18th century English design.



 

 

 

BOWFRONT


Convex shaped front of a chest, buffet, etc., characteristic of 18th century work.

 

BRACKET


A small ornamental shelf. Also, any wall lighting fixture.

A supporting member between the leg and the seat of a chair or table.

Pierced brackets of many designs are characteristic of Chippendale work.

 

 

BRACKET FOOT


Simple base on chests and case furniture of the 18th century.

The foot runs two ways from the corner, in more or less simple shapes.

The type was highly ornamented by Chippendale in England.


 


BREAKFRONT


Front formed on two or more planes. Specifically, the word is now used to describe

a bookcase or cabinet in which a center section projects forward from the two end sections.
 


BROKEN PEDIMENT; BROKEN ARCH:

Referring to a pediment whether straight, swan-neck, or gooseneck,

the side lines or scrolls of which do not meet or come to a point.
 


BUFFET


Sideboard; dining room dresser of almost any description,

used as a receptacle for articles not immediately wanted at the table.



BULL'S EYE MIRROR


Round ornamental mirror, often with convex or concave glass.
 


BUN FOOT


A flattened, gloved, or bun shaped foot, with slender ankle above.

 

 

BUREAU


The name given to an entire family of English desk and drawer combinations

 known in America as a "secretary".  In America, the word came to refer to

a chest of drawers generally for the bedroom.


BURL


An abnormal or diseased growth appearing on trees, often from an injury to the bark.

When sliced into fine cross sections for veneer, they produce beautifully figured patterns.



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Also see our "Guide to Materials and Manufacturing Mediums Used for Antique Reproductions"